1LT Daniel B. Hyde Bracelet (USMA '07)

Daniel Hyde Uniform.jpg
Daniel Hyde Family.jpg
Daniel Hyde Young.jpg
hyde.jpg
Daniel Hyde Uniform.jpg
Daniel Hyde Family.jpg
Daniel Hyde Young.jpg
hyde.jpg

1LT Daniel B. Hyde Bracelet (USMA '07)

25.00

Daniel was an extraordinary person from the day he was born. He did everything well, including sleeping as a baby, learning and playing sports as a child, and being a leader as a young adult.  He was a wonderful son and brother, a kind person, a loyal friend, and a stubbornly hard worker. With all the skills that both came easily to him and that he had to work for, Daniel was never one to boast. He was a humble person who would rather give the credit to someone else if he could. This was actually a problem for his basketball coach in high school; he would opt for passing the ball one more time rather than going for the shot himself. He was always happy to give the assist.  

Sports were Daniel’s biggest hobby from a young age. He took karate and earned two black belts by the time he was in 8th grade. This meant that he was an instructor at the karate school, sometimes having to teach adults. But Daniel was a comfortable and confident leader, and it was a position he always sought out. He was Student Body President in both elementary school and junior high, and the first junior in high school to ever be elected President of the Associated Student Body, a position for which he was again elected as a senior.

Along with basketball, he played football and golf while maintaining a 4.0 GPA. School was something that was very important to Daniel, and he showed an incredible amount of work ethic from a young age.  When other students would give up on a tough math problem in favor of seeking help from a teacher the next day, Daniel would stay with it until he could figure it out. This kind of determination and dedication to learning, as well as his ability to balance school, sports and a bit of a social life, would serve him later on. In a Teen Hall of Fame article in the local paper, Daniel’s advice to fellow students was “Do not accept mediocrity in any aspect of your life”. It was advice he lived by every single day.

Daniel was accepted into the Army, Naval and Air Force Academies, but after visiting the Naval Academy and realizing he wasn’t a big fan of water, he chose to attend West Point.  There he worked as diligently as always on his studies and managed to graduate 23rd in his class of over 900 students, all while serving as 4th Regimental Commander (a position that put him in charge of about 1,000 cadets) in his final year.

After officer training at Ft. Benning, Georgia and earning his Ranger tab, he got to enjoy a few months stationed in Hawaii before his first deployment. He deployed in late 2008 and was killed 5 months later when his vehicle was struck by two IEDs in Samarra, Iraq.

While we love and miss this young man every day, we can’t help but look back at a life of someone who was kind, hard working, thoughtful, smart and fun to be around. We have few regrets of the past, only regrets for the life that he was never given a chance to live. Daniel continues to take care of us through each person he touched who has reached out to us. We are lucky to call many of these people part of our family, and hearing their stories about him just reinforces the kind of person we all knew him to be. If anything can serve as a consolation prize for such a horrific loss, these relationships and the constant love and support from friends comes pretty close.

"Too often do we throw around words like great, extraordinary, perfect, or flawless. It makes it impossible to describe Daniel, but if I had to describe Daniel today in one word, I would call him complete--or a badass."

Derek Cole

Friend of Daniel’s, in the speech he gave at his Memorial Service.

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